Corvette ZR1

Falango

Active Member
#42
I think the spokes on the wheels need to be a bit deeper, and rounder as well. Check out this pic:



Especially with the black paint and matte black wheels, I like yours better, haha. They are bolder, sharper, take note Chevy!

As usual, the render is lookin great! Any renders from the back?
 

exidge

Administrator
#43
Nas! This car is short, but wide, and now you choosed an angle where it looks even shorter! Try to use a better 3/4 angle and more zoomed in! Also wheels seem a little bit too big.

Cheers,
exidge
 

OldDog

Active Member
#44
The front bumper lip is not good, also the small air vents on the front bumper are not wide enough (or it may only be the angle of the shot.

overall the model is great, I do only have a critic on the model accuracy, on the small details, for instance on top of the front bumper (yes again whit the front bumper xP ) where the logo is , those things surrounding it, pointing to the front are to long :p (if you don't know what i mean I'll just post a pic )
some edges are to sharp.

any way, keep it up whit the renders, since i'm kinda late for the modeling part of the critics ;)

Cheers,
Marko
 

TwoOneOne

Administrator
#46
wow. nice progress, and i really like your last rendering, although another angle could be show off this car better.
anyways, good work and check the frontpage ;)
 

nasi

Well-Known Member
#47
@OldDog - I've fixed some things on the front hood scoop area. Made it wider, flatter etc.

Also made the arc from the rear to the door lock at the top much smoother...

@Exidge - Hows this angle? Also made the wheels smaller.

@Falango - Made the adjustments on the wheels, somehow think they need more though...

Here's a first view of the back!!
 

Attachments

naMReg

Active Member
#48
I wish someone creates that Matrix program where you just plug in a cable in your neck and learn a lot of stuff in no time... I want your skills!!! :p
 

Falango

Active Member
#50
Lookin real good! Liking those wheels much better, though the rear one looks small in the wheel well. I'm too tired to go look at ref though, lol. The reverse lights look great, but they are making your taillights look really flat. Are they identical materials? The taillights are lacking the crisp, contrasted reflections that the reverse lights are getting.

EDIT: Scratch that, the taillights are pretty close, lol.
 
#51
I wish someone creates that Matrix program where you just plug in a cable in your neck and learn a lot of stuff in no time... I want your skills!!! :p
I want the same. But let's make it a bit more civilized without plugging cables into our neck. :p Maybe a sort of brainwave machine :p

@NasG Your work is absolutely stunning!
 

Falango

Active Member
#52
But learning is half the fun! When you learn something new, render it out, and realize its exactly what you hoped for, that's the satisfying part.
 
#53
But learning is half the fun! When you learn something new, render it out, and realize its exactly what you hoped for, that's the satisfying part.
True. But I have been 'learning' for over 5 years. And although I have seen a lot of improvement, especially in how easy I can create things, it's never the same quality as what some gentlemen on this forum can produce. Especially rendering wise.

But I would like to know, and this is a question for everyone (if NasG doesn't mind me asking), how did you guys learn to render this great? Is it a tutorial I haven't found yet? A expensive DVD from Digital Tutors or some other page? (Eat3D or something?)

Or is it just experimenting? Because I did that and I never seem to be able to get good results. Either the cars look to reflective, like mirrors, or they just look fake. It's never that studio feel that some of you guys seem to get rather easily.
 

nasi

Well-Known Member
#54
True. But I have been 'learning' for over 5 years. And although I have seen a lot of improvement, especially in how easy I can create things, it's never the same quality as what some gentlemen on this forum can produce. Especially rendering wise.

But I would like to know, and this is a question for everyone (if NasG doesn't mind me asking), how did you guys learn to render this great? Is it a tutorial I haven't found yet? A expensive DVD from Digital Tutors or some other page? (Eat3D or something?)

Or is it just experimenting? Because I did that and I never seem to be able to get good results. Either the cars look to reflective, like mirrors, or they just look fake. It's never that studio feel that some of you guys seem to get rather easily.
I have many 3d pages that i visit everyday for tutorials, making of's etc. The hunger to learn new things is always there because there is ALWAYS someone better than you. Look at all tutorials, there's always something useful in them even if they are unrrelated, even in a character rigging one:p

Also if cars is your thing look at real photography tutorials, there are a few on youtube and bazillions on google. The way proffessionals light real cars is key to understanding how to light your 3d.

I'm no expert but 3d is all about imitating real life and it's the lil details you pick up by going through the tons n tons of tuts and reference that makes your work better..

*also, and i've metioned this before, take a look at anyones early models(dangeruss on DA):eek:ld - http://dangeruss.deviantart.com/gallery/?offset=648#/d47, new - http://dangeruss.deviantart.com/art/YD-Mustang-Concept-front-281206894. Even Exidge's old Ferrari 360!

No one's born brilliant at 3d, sure some pick things up quicker than others but it's hard hard work and a neverending process...
 
#55
I have many 3d pages that i visit everyday for tutorials, making of's etc. The hunger to learn new things is always there because there is ALWAYS someone better than you. Look at all tutorials, there's always something useful in them even if they are unrrelated, even in a character rigging one:p

Also if cars is your thing look at real photography tutorials, there are a few on youtube and bazillions on google. The way proffessionals light real cars is key to understanding how to light your 3d.

I'm no expert but 3d is all about imitating real life and it's the lil details you pick up by going through the tons n tons of tuts and reference that makes your work better..
Thanks for taking the time to explain :)

But stating that you are no expert is cutting yourself a bit too short. I think you are doing great and everything you have made that I have seen looks realistic and expert like to me ! :D
 

Falango

Active Member
#59
True. But I have been 'learning' for over 5 years. And although I have seen a lot of improvement, especially in how easy I can create things, it's never the same quality as what some gentlemen on this forum can produce. Especially rendering wise.

But I would like to know, and this is a question for everyone (if NasG doesn't mind me asking), how did you guys learn to render this great? Is it a tutorial I haven't found yet? A expensive DVD from Digital Tutors or some other page? (Eat3D or something?)

Or is it just experimenting? Because I did that and I never seem to be able to get good results. Either the cars look to reflective, like mirrors, or they just look fake. It's never that studio feel that some of you guys seem to get rather easily.
Tutorials, practice, experimenting, and just doing it. I went to school for 2 years learning Maya, and felt I had learned quite a bit, but I am still learning something new every day. For example, today I learned that the transfer attributes feature in Maya works when transferring attributes from a single object, to a group of objects, as long as they have the exact same vert count, placement, etc. I know I'll learn something new tomorrow, and the next day!

Tutorials really are the start. There are tons and tons of tutorials that make things so much easier to understand and do! spot3D home page is a fantastic resource for understanding render engines. I read through a PDF on there about VRay for Maya, and the explanations and examples are brilliant! One mistake people make when learning new things in the 3D world, is they first learn and try it on large scale projects. Want to learn a new technique? Practice and render it out on cubes, simple. There is less to go wrong, easier to troubleshoot, faster to setup initially, way faster to render, and it's easier to understand and stick to that task. Trying out new motion blur techniques on an animated race car with 30 other race cars, and 4k textures, HD1080 renders, and so on, pulls you away from what you're trying to learn, you get distracted. Keep tests simple, make note of your new knowledge, and apply it to your larger project for less downtime!

I haven't had the chance to complete a personal project in a long time. I have a few in my plate that I'd really like to push through, but it's impossible to find time right now. I really hope I find the time to get in on the next contest, as I've missed every single one with the hopes of testing my limits and applying everything I've learned to this day.